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What Are The Fantastic Four’s Super Powers? Marvel’s First Family, Explained

A mere few years into the Marvel Comics tenure, Reed Richards and Sue Storm marry and later have a child. Franklin Richards debuts in the pages of “Fantastic Four Annual” #6 from August 1968, and in subsequent years, it’s revealed just how notable this next-generation Fantastic Four member really is. As he grows older, it becomes apparent that he’s one of the most powerful beings in the known Marvel Universe. He can warp reality, travel through time, and manipulate matter, in addition to being a capable telekinetic, to name a few of his abilities. Franklin ultimately uses most of his immense power to aid in the restoration of the Multiverse.

As for Reed and Sue’s daughter, Valeria Richards, she hasn’t had nearly as much time to shine as her brother. Still, that’s not to say her journey hasn’t been a fascinating one. Upon helping Sue give birth to her using magic and science, Doctor Doom turns Valeria into his familiar, allowing him to see through her eyes. He then uses her to antagonize the Fantastic Four, though they’re able to defeat him and free Valeria from his influence. In the ensuing years, her intelligence grows at an exponential rate, making her one of the smartest beings in the Marvel Universe. In fact, it’s no stretch to say the young heroine is on the same level as — or beyond — her father.

Evidently, all of the Fantastic Four members bring something special to the table, hence why they’re such an effective team. It’ll be interesting to see how their powers and family dynamics are translated to the big screen when they finally make their MCU debut.

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