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Whatever Happened To These Characters After The Lord Of The Rings?

At the end of “Return of the King,” Aragorn fulfills his birthright and is finally crowned King of Gondor. He marries his true love, Arwen (Liv Tyler), and refuses to let his Hobbit friends bow to him after their courage. Given the title King Elessar Telcontar by Galadriel (Cate Blanchett), Aragorn brought a new sort of peace to Gondor and Arnor in his many years as King. He ended up living to be 210 years old and officially ushered in the Fourth Age of Middle-earth. He was the 26th King of Arnor, the 35th King of Gondor, and the first High King of the Reunited Kingdom.

Ruling over the House of Telcontar — which is a form of Elvish for “Strider,” the name he adopted when ran with the Dúnedain Rangers — it was Aragorn who initiated a longstanding peace between Men, Elves, and Dwarves following the War of the Ring. Additionally, he led a campaign to reclaim much of the land that Gondor and Arnor had lost during the time there wasn’t a king on the throne. This largely centered around conquering the Easterlings and Haradrim, who had previously fought for Sauron during the Third Age.

When he reached his final year, Aragorn recognized that his life was at an end and passed his crown onto his son Eldarion, who ruled faithfully in his stead. Retiring to the House of Kings, Aragorn died with Arwen by his side.

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