MOVIES

Why Donald Trump Is Threatening To Sue Sebastian Stan’s New Film

So what exactly is “The Apprentice,” and why is one of the two men running for President of the United States so mad about it that he and his team threatening a lawsuit (and releasing relatively incendiary statements)? Well, the title may clue you in considering that it’s a reference to Donald Trump’s NBC reality show of the same name and tells the story of Trump’s life as a major real-estate developer in Manhattan. Marvel Cinematic Universe mainstay Sebastian Stan plays the man himself, while Maria Bakalova — who earned an Academy Award nomination for her supporting role in “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” — plays his first wife, Ivana Trump (who, in real life, passed away in 2022). Jeremy Strong, the Emmy-winning Method actor who spent four seasons as Kendall Roy on “Succession,” also plays a major role as real-life figure Roy Cohn, the New York “fixer” who worked with Senator Joseph McCarthy and courted controversy until his death in 1986.

The movie definitely doesn’t paint Trump in a flattering light, according to early buzz from the Cannes Film Festival. When it premiered on the Croisette during the festival, moviegoers were appalled by a scene where Trump sexually assaults his wife Ivana, and elsewhere in the film, he has liposuction, gets a surgical procedure to deal with a bald spot on his head, and takes amphetamines. Trump may be threatening a lawsuit over the film, but it already got released despite strenous objections from one of its backers … so who knows if the former President’s legal action will actually go anywhere.

“The Apprentice” does not have a theatrical release date as of this writing.

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