MOVIES

A Mad Max Saga’s Immortan Joe Looks Like Under The Mask

In “Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga,” Immortan Joe is brought to life by actor Lachy Hulme who, unsurprisingly, looks nothing like his ghastly big screen counterpart. Hulme — known for such productions as “The Matrix Revolutions,” “Offspring,” and another George Miller film, “Three Thousand Years of Longing,” to name a few — boasts neat dark brown hair, a healthy complexion, and facial hair. In fact, the only feature he and the villain have in common is their piercing blue eyes. When Joe makes his franchise debut in “Mad Max: Fury Road,” the aged, decaying warlord is portrayed by the late, great Hugh Keays-Byrne – one of several “Mad Max” actors you might not know passed away. He too looked nothing like the ruthless Wasteland resident.

As if Joe’s intricate costume and obscured face don’t make it hard enough to distinguish Hulme and Keays-Byrne’s takes on the character, the former also went above and beyond to do right by the role and honor his predecessor’s performance. “I said, ‘Well, somebody needs to step up for Hugh. Someone needs to honour this great man. I can do it. I can do the voice. And it’s all in the eyes,'” Hulme told Empire, recalling that Miller nearly settled for a body double for the part. The actor actually pulled double-duty in the prequel, portraying Rizzdale Pell as well.

Between Anya Taylor-Joy’s work as Furiosa (which she says traumatized her) and Lachy Hulme’s take on Immortan Joe, it’s safe to say “Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga” is two for two in the recast department. Time will tell if Joe is recast for a third time down the road and if that actor will have the chance to show his unmasked face to the world.

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