MOVIES

Deadpool’s Moral Code Explained

Most of the time, Deadpool doesn’t seem to show any remorse for his actions. If anything, Wade seems more likely to deflect the blame, like when he plays dumb about the bodies left in his wake after the freeway chase in “Deadpool.” Since Deadpool is practically unkillable, he almost never needs to deal with the consequences of his actions.

However, when it matters most, Deadpool will own up to his mistakes. Take Vanessa’s death in “Deadpool 2,” for example. “One of the a******s who killed Vanessa got away,” he tells Colossus afterward, referring to himself. He knows that he let a bad guy get away because he didn’t want to be late for his anniversary, and that same bad guy killed Vanessa. Looking back, Deadpool is willing to admit that it only happened thanks to his own cockiness and negligence.

Later in the film, Russell starts to look up to Deadpool as a father figure, yet Deadpool pushes him away, leaving the kid behind at the prison and dismissing Russell as a pathetic loser when he doesn’t think the boy is listening. Knowing that he helped push the boy over the edge, Deadpool feels partly responsible for Russell’s villainous turn. So he decides to set things right — first by apologizing to Russell, and when that fails, dying for him. Sure, Deadpool’s final sacrifice is not-so-final, thanks to the magic of time travel (and the need to continue the franchise), but it’s the thought that counts, right?

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