MOVIES

Kingdom Of The Planet Of The Apes May Feature A Familiar Weapon (SPOILER: It’s Bad)

“Beneath the Planet of the Apes” introduces a cult of telepathic mutant humans who worship the Alpha-Omega bomb as a deity and refer to it as the “Divine Bomb.” It’s eventually revealed that the weapon itself was not only created by human scientists sometime in the late 20th century but that it was also designed to be powerful enough to completely destroy Earth. That’s exactly what happens, too, when the bomb is detonated at the end of the film. Taking that into account, along with the fact that its predecessor features a military group literally known as Alpha-Omega, it doesn’t seem out of the question that “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes” could feature its own version of the Divine Bomb.

Notably, the new film’s first trailer confirms many of the details included in a plot synopsis that was posted online last year by Hollywood insider Daniel Richtman. In that plot summary, Richtman alleged that the forthcoming sequel will introduce a villainous new ape king named Proximus Caesar (Kevin Durand) who has discovered the “last vestiges of human technology” hidden beneath the earth. Whether or not the “technology” that Proximus seeks to recover really is a new take on the Alpha-Omega Bomb remains to be seen.

That said, it’d certainly make sense for it to be a nuclear weapon of some kind. After all, not only does the underground location featured in the “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes” trailer look a whole lot like a missile silo, but a nuclear bomb would also make it nearly impossible for any other human or ape to challenge Proximus’ power.

Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button

MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK MUCUK